Calendar

Throughout the year, Philadelphia Dance Projects presents stimulating and provocative programs, from performances by renowned independent dance artists and companies to film events, workshops, classes, educational programs, and forums for artists, aspiring artists, and students, all geared toward a broad-based audience.

Bilateral: Budapest/Philadelphia Dance Artists Exchange 2016

Wednesday, September 21, 2016 - 7:00pm
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 Bilateral: Budapest/Philadelphia Dance Artists Exchange 2016

PDP is pleased to announce that Anna Biczok  and Imre Vass will guest artists in Philadelphia beginning mid-September for a three week creative and cultural exchange residency.  Both have collaborated with choreographer Adrienn Hod, who was Bilateral Artist in the Fall of 2014.  Imre also toured as dancer with Ultima Vez/Wim Vendekebus in 2009-10.

Anna began creating her own work in 2014. At present she says, I am working mainly with improvisation techniques and scores to explore unknown, unconcious territories appearing in the moment. I am obsessed with personal point of views, specific colourful authonomic interpretation of one’s peculiar relation to the world. Dance art is the most beautiful field of this exploration for me, as it needs the whole bodymind for creation. I could not imagine any material that has more stake than this temporarily alive flesh called body.”

Imre has been creating his own work since 2010 and besides being presented in Budapest he has shown his work in Berlin, Copenhagen, London, Bratislava, Vienna, Brussels. He says “I travel a lot as a performer and I am looking forward to find ways to establish myself as an international dance-maker as well. The cultural policy and infrastructure is not supporting the kind art I am representing, but it is not the primary cause I am keeping my sight outside of the borders of Hungary. I want to make art that deals with specific, local issues but holds a global awareness.”

Meet The Bilateral Artists on Wednesday, September 21 at 7PM
at The Whole Shebang, 1813 South 11th Streetwww.thewholeshebangphilly.com

FREE   RSVP infoatphiladanceprojects [dot] org 215.546.2552

Bilateral Interactions share practice and create dance together…..
Imre Vass would like to invite peer artists to come together and share their practices, dance knowledge and choreography Thurs. September 29 6-9PM and Sat. October 1, 12:30-4:30PM FREE at The Whole Shebang.

Anna Biczok is looking for artists who would like to participate in a “quickshare project” maybe 4 or 5 “rehearsal preparation and with the option to make a short performance event.”  (Date/Time to be set by mutual availability).  

Location: 
The Whole Shebang
1813 South 11th Street
Philadelphia, PA
Phone: 215.546.2552

Trio A - a workshop with Pat Catterson

$35 | Tickets coming soon at danceboxoffice.com
Saturday, October 15, 2016 - 1:00pm
Sunday, October 16, 2016 - 1:00pm
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Trio A

What can be learned today from Yvonne Rainer’s 1966 influential work Trio A? Fifty years later, the impact of Rainer’s revolutionary ideas and work is still evident in the current choreographic scene. Although Rainer’s famous “No Manifesto” was not written about Trio A, this dance is a manifesto in itself. Its form, vocabulary, and performing stance challenged traditional choreographic methods and modes of presentation. Pat Catterson’s Trio A Workshop provides an introduction to an aesthetic that has served as a springboard for succeeding generations of dance makers.

In this Workshop, Trio A’s philosophical, physical and historical relevance is examined and experienced.  Students will learn part of the dance, be given composition exercises around its projects, some reading assignments, and be led in a discussion of its ideas, contexts and their experiences.

ACCESS READINGS HERE: The first contains three by Yvonne but only read the first one and maybe the second.  The second one is the one I wrote about my experiences seeing, learning performing and teaching Trio A. It was published in Dance Research Journal.

Research Journal.

Rainer, Yvonne. ³The Mind is a Muscle,²  ³A Quasi Survey of Some Minimalist Tendencies in the Quantitatively Minimal Dance Activity Midst the Plethora,or an Analysis of Trio A,² ³Some Non-Chronological Recollections of the Mind is a Muscle,² ³Profile: Interview by Lyn Blumenthal.² A Woman WhoŠ
Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press, 1999. 27-84.

Catterson, Pat. ³I Promised Myself I would Never Let It Leave My Body¹s

Memory.² Dance Research Journal. Winter 2009. Issue 42/2. 1-11.

Artists

Yvonne Rainer

Yvonne Rainer, one of the founders of the Judson Dance Theater (1962), made a transition to filmmaking following a fifteen-year career as a choreographer/dancer (1960-1975). After making seven experimental feature-length films  — “Lives of Performers” (1972), “Privilege” (1990), and “MURDER and murder” (1996), among others — she returned to dance in 2000 via a commission from the Baryshnikov Dance Foundation (“After Many a Summer Dies the Swan”). Since then she has made six dances, including “AG Indexical, with a little help from H.M.,” “Assisted Living: Do you have any money?” and “The Concept of Dust: Continuous Project – Altered Annually.” Her dances have been seen throughout the U.S., including the Whitney Museum, the Museum of Modern Art, the Kitchen, Dia Beacon; in Europe at the

 

Louvre and Montpelier, also Documenta 12, Helsinki, Italy, Dublin; and Sao Paulo. Museum retrospectives of her work, including drawings, photos, films, notebooks, and memorabilia, have been presented at Kunsthaus Bregenz and Museum Ludwig, Cologne (2012); the Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles; Jeu de Paume, École des Beaux Artes, La Ferme du Buisson, Paris, and Raven Row, London (2014). A memoir — “Feelings Are Facts: a Life” — was published by MIT Press in 2006. A selection of her poetry was published in 2011 by Paul Chan’s Badlands Unlimited. Other writings have been collected in “Work: 1961-73” (1974); “The Films of Y.R.” (1989); and “A Woman Who…: Essays, Interviews, Scripts (1999).

Pat Catterson

Pat Catterson first worked with Ms Rainer and performed TRIO A in 1969, first taught the dance for her in 1971, and has assisted and danced for her since Rainer’s return to choreography in 1999, touring nationally and internationally. She has taught and performed TRIO A countless times since and has found that learning it is the best way to understand the aesthetic shift it represented. Catterson has written about her experiences seeing, learning, performing and teaching TRIO A in her essay “I Promised Myself I Would Never Let It Leave My Body’s Memory” published in the Winter 2009 issue of Dance Research Journal. Most recently she set early Rainer works on the Stephen Petronio Company for his Bloodlines Project, for the exhibit Yvonne Rainer: Dance Works at Raven Row Gallery in London and performed these and other works herself in Boris Charmatz’ Twenty dancers for the XX Century at the Tate Modern.

 

This  Trio A Workshop has been conducted at the CODA Festival in Oslo, the Kalamata International Festival in Greece, at the Danish National School of Contemporary Dance in Copenhagen as well as at schools in the USA including Sarah Lawrence College, NYU, the New School and Muhlenberg College.

 

She also has her own notable choreographic career, having made 108 works. She has received numerable grants and commissions, including a 2011 Award from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, and multiple Choreography Fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the CAPS Grants and the Harkness Foundation, as well as a Fulbright Commission. Ms Catterson’s parents were a ballroom dancing team and her paternal grandfather a Vaudevillian tap dancer. A dedicated educator, she has been on the faculties at Sarah Lawrence College, UCLA, the Juilliard School, and the Merce Cunningham Studio, among many others. She has been a guest artist all over the US and in Europe and for twenty years she taught her own tap classes in NYC. Her writing has also been published in Ballet Review, JOPERD, Attitude Magazine, Dance Magazine Online, and the Getty Iris. She earned her BA in psychology and philosophy from Northwestern University and her MFA in Interdisciplinary Arts from Goddard College. This past summer she taught a workshop seminar in the Kalamata Dance Festival in Greece around her latest work NOW., an installation/performance/event that paired her NYC dancers with dancers in nine other countries via Skype projection.

Location: 
Performance Garage
1515 Brandywine Street
Philadelphia 19130
Phone: (215) 546-2552

Feelings are Facts: The Life of Yvonne Rainer and Lecture

Screening & Lecture $25.00 | Screening only $10 | Lecture only $20
Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 6:00pm
Wednesday, October 19, 2016 - 8:00pm
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Feelings are Facts: The Life of Yvonne Rainer and Lecture
Feelings are Facts: The Life of Yvonne Rainer and Lecture

FEELINGS ARE FACTS: THE LIFE OF YVONNE RAINER   Wednesday, October 19   6PM
Philadelphia premiere of new documentary film by JACK WALSH
post screening discussion with Jack Walsh and Yvonne Rainer

WHAT’S SO FUNNY? LAUGHTER AND ANGER IN THE TIME OF THE ASSASSINS
Wednesday, October 19   8PM
“an amalgam of jokes and rants around the current emotional and political dilemmas of the artist and concerned citizen”  by YVONNE RAINER

 

Yvonne Rainer, one of the founders of the Judson Dance Theater (1962), made a transition to filmmaking following a fifteen-year career as a choreographer/dancer (1960-1975). After making seven experimental feature-length films  — “Lives of Performers” (1972), “Privilege” (1990), and “MURDER and murder” (1996), among others — she returned to dance in 2000 via a commission from the Baryshnikov Dance Foundation (“After Many a Summer Dies the Swan”). Since then she has made six dances, including “AG Indexical, with a little help from H.M.,” “Assisted Living: Do you have any money?” and “The Concept of Dust: Continuous Project – Altered Annually.” Her dances have been seen throughout the U.S., including the Whitney Museum, the Museum of Modern Art, the Kitchen, Dia Beacon; in Europe at the Louvre and Montpelier, also Documenta 12, Helsinki, Italy, Dublin; and Sao Paulo. Museum retrospectives of her work, including drawings, photos, films, notebooks, and memorabilia, have been presented at Kunsthaus Bregenz and Museum Ludwig, Cologne (2012); the Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles; Jeu de Paume, École des Beaux Artes, La Ferme du Buisson, Paris, and Raven Row, London (2014). A memoir — “Feelings Are Facts: a Life” — was published by MIT Press in 2006. A selection of her poetry was published in 2011 by Paul Chan’s Badlands Unlimited. Other writings have been collected in “Work: 1961-73” (1974); “The Films of Y.R.” (1989); and “A Woman Who…: Essays, Interviews, Scripts (1999).

FILM SYNOPISIS
FEELINGS ARE FACTS: THE LIFE OF YVONNE RAINER  

“The function of art is to shake us out of our complacency and comfort,” says Yvonne Rainer, whose avant‐garde performances and films have agitated audiences for 50 years. Since co‐founding New York’s influential Judson Dance Theater, Rainer’s boundary‐crossing art has been labeled in many ways: feminist, conceptual, post‐ modern, political. Feelings Are Facts examines the contradictions and creativity of this remarkable provocateur—still performing at age 80—and raises the question, What does is mean to be an avant‐garde artist today?

Yvonne Rainer exploded onto the performance scene in the early 1960’s, a protégé of John Cage and Merce Cunningham, boldly pursuing a minimalist aesthetic, using everyday, often random movements that confounded critics. At Judson, she collaborated with the rule‐breaking artists of her generation: Robert Rauschenberg, Trisha Brown, Steve Paxton, Lucinda Childs, and Meredith Monk. With foundational works like “Trio A,” Rainer radically altered the vocabulary of modern dance forever.

In the 1970s, Rainer turned from performance to filmmaking, bringing both humorous storytelling and dense theory to seven independent features. As she investigated subjects like political power, terrorism, lesbian sexuality, and breast cancer, the labels again poured forth. Were her films “difficult” or “accessible”? Funny or frustrating? After 25 years of filmmaking and encouraged by dancers including Mikhail Baryshnikov, Rainer, in her 60s, returned to choreography once again to make courageous, unpredictable dances. Feelings Are Facts presents Rainer from her revolutionary roots to her tireless current explorations, breaking rules and challenging audiences no matter what decade she finds herself in.

http://www.feelingsarefacts.com

Artists

Jack Walsh

Inhabiting the worlds of television, film festivals and art museums, Jack Walsh’s films incite, probe, challenge and inform viewers on topics ranging from cultural icons to social justice to sexual identity. Working in both the experimental film and the documentary film genres, over the course of his career Jack directed nine films: Feelings Are Facts: The Life of Yvonne Rainer2015; The Lost Generation, 2004; The Second Coming, 1995; Dear Rock, 1993; Present Tense,1987; Working Class Chronicle, 1985; Document Unearthed…, 1984; Basic Training, 1984; and Beachwalk, 1983. He is an Emmy Award-winning producer of the documtaries And Then One Night: The Making of Dead Man Walking and Screaming Queens: The Riot at Compton’s Cafeteria. His other producer credits include Hope along the Wind: The Life of Harry Hay and Girl Trouble.

Jack is the recipient of numerous awards for his films among them three Golden Gate Awards from the San Francisco International Film Festival, and his productions have received funding from the National Endowment for the Arts, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, the Independent Television Service (ITVS) and most recently The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Feelings Are Facts: The Life of Yvonne Rainer, is Jack’s documentary directorial debut, which premiered in the Documentary Panorama at the Berlin International Film Festival in February 2015, and has been screening around the globe since then.

http://www.feelingsarefacts.com

Location: 
Christ Church Neighborhood House
20 N American Street
Philadelphia 19106
Phone: (215) 546-2552

Past Events

BIGS AND LITTLES: A workshop in parent-child dance teaching

April 17, 2016 - 1:00pm
Teaser:

Movement is our first expressive and aesthetic experience. We DANCE from the time we are born, if not before. The early years are a critical time for developing understanding of self, others, and the world around us. How do we create experiences for the youngest children (0-5 yrs) to express, explore, create, move and dance? Teaching infants, babies, toddlers, preschoolers and their adult caregivers has unique opportunities and challenges.

Body Percussion with Judy Freed

April 3, 2016 - 1:00pm
Teaser:

The body is a universally available instrument for creating rhythmic, musical orchestrations composed of claps, slaps, and stamps. Body percussion is a very accessible and playful tool for teaching rhythm, musicality, and physical coordination, as well as inspiring group engagement and positive peer interactions. It can be done in small spaces, with adults and children, and lends itself to simplicity and complexity as needed. Nothing required but the body and some concentration! Dance TAGers will come away with a fresh and useful skill set, and will have a lot of fun in the process!

Creative Movement and the African Aesthetic led by Cherie Hill

March 13, 2016 - 1:00pm
Teaser:

Come join TAG for a unique workshop with Cherie Hill, teaching artist visiting from the Bay Area.  The workshop will look at how two forms, one that is concept-based, and the other, body-based, can be used to gain a deeper understanding of African dance through a creative format.  Concepts can be utilized to move the body polyrhythmically while expressing essences of African movement. We will begin with a warm-up that incorporates developmental patterns and African dance movements, then move into an exploration that focuses on the energy concepts of contract and expand.

SILENT STORIES: Narrative and the Body

December 6, 2015 - 1:00pm
Teaser:

Seasoned teaching artists and physical theatre makers Tasha Milkman and Maryruth Stine team up to offer a unique opportunity to discover how silent stories weave strong webs between performer and audience, action and imagination. This workshop will include a warm-up and skill building activities in mime and expression that will explore storytelling, character, and performance. Look forward to short performances that will change your definition of mime, and absorb new skills for solo and ensemble pieces.

PROJECT BASED LEARNING AND DANCE: a 21st Century fit

November 15, 2015 - 1:00pm
Teaser:

Come to TAG to learn about Project Based Learning and how it can be applied to dance from E. Brown. She uses it as the organizing structure for her teaching at the arts-based charter school in Chester. PBL involves a “driving question,” research, collaboration, and performance. She will show clips of her students’ work and then lead the participants through a sample PBL experience. Publicly funded after-school arts programs in Philadelphia now require that staff know how to use PBL. Here’s a great chance to learn more about it.